Facebook Graph Search Review: How it Works

social media how toFacebook recently announced Graph Search.

In this article I’ll share what Facebook’s Graph Search is, how it works and how it fits your marketing strategy.

What Is Graph Search?

Graph Search is Facebook’s latest revision to the search feature that helps users find connections to people and places that have always existed in the graph.

In a sense, it’s a clean interface into the breadth of Facebook data that people have entered into Facebook, but contextualized to each user.

Watch this video introducing Facebook Graph Search.

Think about that for a moment. Facebook’s new Graph Search serves up personalized search results in real time based on a person’s graph, and it does this for over 1 billion people.

Kudos to the Facebook engineering team for this major achievement.

As you’ll see below, it’s early for Graph Search. The features and use cases haven’t been fully fleshed out. And Graph Search is still in a very limited beta program.

But this first version gives us clues about how Facebook may evolve and the strengths on which they’ll try to build.

Walkthrough of Facebook Graph Search

Let’s start with a search about one of my favorite foods—bacon!

In the screenshot below, you can see a search for “bacon” in the old Facebook search format. Search results provide a listing of Pages, People and Places with the search term “bacon.”

bacon old search

A search query for “bacon” in the existing, original Facebook Search format.

This is helpful if you’re looking for something that includes “bacon” in the title of the Page, a person/profile or a place. But it doesn’t give you any insight into all of the other places on Facebook where there may be relevant social context to bacon. Who likes it? Who has commented on it? What else can the social graph tell us about friends and bacon? The original Facebook search does nothing for you if you want to know these things.

This is dumb search, in essence, not unlike what we experienced with the first search engines in the late 1990s.

Facebook’s Graph Search

Now let’s walk through a Graph Search for bacon. Here’s what you see when you use a semantic search for “bacon” on Facebook.

graph search bacon

Facebook Graph Search results for “bacon.”

Note that I’m provided with suggestions related to the search term I’ve entered. You can get to the Facebook Page for bacon, the Interest, the People who like bacon, My Friends who like bacon, photos of bacon, web searches of bacon and bacon wrapped water chestnuts.

Who knew?

To navigate to one of the semantic search options, you can use the tab key to go a level deeper to find the people or Pages that you want.

This is really Facebook’s first foray into what is known as semantic search. Put simply, semantic search is a concept referring to technologies that make a search respond to what the user enters to try to better understand what the user wants to know.

Think of it as interaction between the search technology and the user to provide better search results. Search engines have done this for several years now when they fill out your search box for you and provide suggested keywords. It’s employing technology to get you closer to your answer without your direct intervention.

Semantic search is a relatively new technology, so you have to accept this as an ongoing evolution and not a revolution. Semantic search is getting better every day, but has a long way to go to be precise based on your interests and behaviors.

Search for Facebook Interest Pages

Here’s a look at the bacon Interest Page to see if there are any changes. Sure enough, there are. You get additional information on the interest provided by Wikipedia. OK, that’s useful.

bacon interest page

Screenshot of the bacon Interest Page.

Additionally, you can immediately see who among my friends likes bacon, as well as photos that are captioned with the word bacon. This was discoverable before, but not nearly as easily. Overall, the Interest Page layout is different and improved in order to make social context clearer to the user.

You may notice as well that at the top of the screen, the URL carries a ?sid=0.002… code. The implication here is that Facebook is tracking how people use Graph Search in order to improve the product.

code end of url

Note the code at the end of the URL for this search.

Additionally, the Interest Page includes posts by friends about bacon and Related Pages, which are in the screenshot below. It’s interesting that these posts are not individually mined by Facebook and made searchable, although I suspect that’s a forthcoming feature for Facebook’s Graph Search.

bacon posts

Finally, wistful posts from my friends about bacon. People just love bacon.

Search with the “Friends Who Like” Option

Continuing on in the semantic search, there’s an option in the Search Bar for “My Friends who like bacon.”

In the screenshot below, you’ll see a long list of my surely cholesterol-challenged Friends who like bacon.

friends who like bacon

My friends who like bacon, provided by Facebook’s Graph Search.

You’ll see a long list with the ability to refine your search on the right side of the screen. This appears to be sorted by the number of friends and subscribers for these items.

At the top of the list is Brian Carter, a fellow author and speaker. Interesting that I don’t interact with him all that much, but he’s at the top of my list. I’d have expected this to be sorted by the number of interactions we’ve had rather than social reach. But that’s something Facebook can tweak later.

In the right-hand sidebar, you can narrow your search further to find specifically who you’re looking for. Additionally, at the bottom right of the screen is a link to “More Pages they like.”

Curiosity kills me, so I decide to take a gander at that one. Not a lot of surprises here. As you can see, I have supportive friends who like my book, Austin, eating healthy and technology. Yep. Sounds about right.

This is a handy tool to identify Pages you should like. Interestingly, these are not sorted by the number of Page likes, but rather the number of friends who like each Page.

male friends like bacon

Pages liked by my male friends who also like bacon.

If I go back to the top of the screen and click the search box, I get another level of friends who enjoy bacon. Now Facebook’s semantic search technology combines your groups and affiliations with your search term, in this case “bacon.” Presumably this is to give you the best opportunity to find people with intersecting interests and commonalities. Clever.

I use the feature to find a friend or two in each category. I wouldn’t necessarily call this “intelligent,” but if it were hooked up to Siri on my iPhone, I’d be simultaneously amazed and creeped out by now.

groups and affiliations who like bacon

Next level of Facebook’s semantic Graph Search—suggesting I look at people from my groups and past affiliations who also like bacon.

In the “bacon” search results in the image below, you’ll notice “Photos of Bacon.” When you click the search box here, you are again presented with additional semantic options. In this case it’s “Photos of Bacon taken in Austin, Texas.”

another level of context

Facebook’s Graph Search providing another level of semantic context beyond Photos of Bacon.

This is designed to get you closer to the search result you want. It reads from your profile to see your location. In this case I’m in Austin, TX and Graph Search tries to match your search term to something that is likely relevant to you.

There are not a lot of options here for this semantic search of Photos of Bacon, but remember this is a new technology that will improve over time and will include more data as time goes on.

Search to Find a Local Business

Are you hungry for lunch and craving a hot dog? Let’s use Facebook to find something.

A search for “hot dogs” gives the following results:

  • A Facebook Page for a local Austin restaurant
  • A restaurant in Lesage, WV
  • The Place Page
  • The Hot Dogs Interest Page
  • Hot Dogs from Baja California

    search for hot dog

    A search for “hot dogs” yields disappointing local results.

It’s curious why these particular search results for “hot dogs” come up, and none of the thousands of other places between Austin and Lesage, WV. Do hot dog restaurants not market themselves on Facebook? Doubtful. And if you’re a marketer for a company selling hot dogs, how do you get on this list? Can you even break into Graph Search?

I’m surprised that chains that sell hot dogs, such as Sonic or Dairy Queen, are not listed here while Hillbilly Hot Dogs is. This isn’t terribly impressive, but I’ll chalk this up to necessary cleanup for the Graph Search beta.

Let’s investigate the only viable option for me here—Frank Hot Dogs. The first thing that jumps out is the redesigned Facebook Page that really looks more like a Yelp or Google local business listing. Address, website and map are all prominently displayed, as is the social context of my friend who likes Frank.

frank hot dogs

Frank Hot Dogs in Austin, TX.

Below the fold is also a listing of other local businesses near Frank, where you can presumably walk off your lunch. Notice in the image below that the listings in the “Places Near Frank” are sorted by the number of likes each local business has.

It’s interesting that social proof (in the form of a like) is used to build out your choices, even though Frank is in downtown Austin and is surrounded by other options.

near franks

Places near Frank Hot Dogs.

Search for Hot Topics and What Friends Are Saying

One final scenario here—let’s look at how Graph Search can help us find conversations on Facebook that would interest us.

Apple has been in the news a lot lately with earnings announcements, popular products and conjecture about the company as a stock investment.

Here’s what Facebook has to offer for a search of “Apple”: an Interest, a Sponsored app (interesting), Applebee’s, Apple for Education (?), the Apple Store and Apple as a Place.

graph search for apple

Here’s a Graph Search for “Apple.”

When you click Apple, Inc., you get a new set of semantic results. This is significantly better—as I have friends who work at Apple, I was expecting to see that. But it’s several levels down and requires you to go through several steps to find it.

So usability is an issue, and in the efforts to create something “semantic,” Facebook might have made it somewhat difficult to navigate, at least today.

Also note that there is no mention of status updates or comments that people have made about Apple. I’d really like to see that in one place.

what friends say

You need to go through several steps before you find out what your friends are saying about Apple.

Facebook Graph Search—What Do We Know?

1. It’s a better interface into a lot of data that we’ve been able to access for a while. Facebook is making it easier and is using it to help users discover commonalities with friends and discover places to visit.

2. In several places, results show that Page likes are a proxy for “wisdom of the crowd,” and are given preferential treatment over those not as fortunate. This is important for marketers—Facebook considers likes to be valuable social validation and a driver for recommendations. Contrast that to Yelp, where a large number of positive reviews are considered to be premium social capital.

3. It’s clear that Facebook regards Pages with more fans to be more important than those without. Watch for this trend to continue and for Facebook to make social search more data-driven.

4. Page likes are “link-building” in the context of Facebook. Today you have to optimize your content for feedback to show up in the news feed, but that could very well extend to mobile devices and social search on Facebook and possibly beyond.

5. Brand-building is going to be tougher in a few years than it is today. It will only get harder over time, so there’s a case to be made for action to be taken now to build an active and engaged audience on Facebook while it is relatively inexpensive and easy.

6. Status update and comment content is largely untapped as a data resource in this version of Graph Search. It’s a huge opportunity that will certainly make Graph Search a richer experience for users.

7. For businesses seeking leads and customers, Facebook is taking its first steps to capture and calculate how its local listings and discoverability features result in sales. Attributing Facebook actions to more leads, sales and profit is an important theme for Facebook moving forward. Graph Search can and will ultimately help with that.

8. Finally, any person who changes privacy settings to Private is going to be largely undiscoverable in Graph Search. That may not be a big deal today, but could become one as Graph Search becomes a richer and more important part of the Facebook experience.

Summary

Facebook has taken the next step in evolving beyond social into social-driven search. Is it going to replace Google anytime soon? No, but that isn’t the question to ask today. Facebook is taking steps to make social relevant in the context of search—and that’s a long-term project.

This first version is promising, but has a long way to go to meet its full potential.

The takeaway for marketers is that the basics really haven’t changed significantly. You need to host a thriving and growing community on Facebook to take full advantage of how the industry evolves. You need more fans, more comments and more social engagement. That’s always been the case. But we haven’t known where the industry is heading necessarily.

Graph Search is a window into the future, but a largely unrealized vision today that will take time to emerge. Think about how Facebook will improve the overall user experience using data in the Graph in the future.

Slowly but surely, it’s becoming a bigger part of our lives. What do you think about this new feature? Leave your questions and comments in the box below.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

About the Author, Chris Treadaway

Chris Treadaway is Founder & CEO of Polygraph Media, a social data analytics company, and co-author of Facebook Marketing An Hour a Day with Mari Smith. Other posts by »




More Info
  • Pingback: Facebook Graph Search Review, How it Works | Social Media … | Merolog Web Host

  • Dejeesh dev

    Great read Chris Treadaway, thanks for displaying such a nice blog with FB Graph search Video.

  • Pingback: Facebook Graph Search Review, How it Works « Social Media / SEO / Mobile / Digital Marketing News

  • http://www.solidradicle.com/ Ganeshan Nadarajan

    Graph Search is a window to the future, but a largely unrealized vision that will take time to emerge.

  • Pingback: Should Your Company Market on Social Media? - Business Strategies

  • Pingback: email marketing | Why Brands Should Be Marketing Opportunists + MORE 02/14/2013 | Free SEO Training

  • Dara Khajavi

    I love bacon! Anyways, this graph search should have interesting effects on businesses. It is taking search to the next level “social search”. I believe that eventually people will use Facebook graph search instead of sites like Yelp. I am interested in seeing the effects of this change on other social media sites.

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    IMO, it’s a few versions away until this becomes a major threat to Yelp and others. But it’s trending in that direction, I agree. :)

  • Rev. Akasha Lonsdale

    Great post Chris, very informative and well presented. Thanks

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Thank you :) The editors at Social Media Examiner are excellent.

  • Cathy Taughinbaugh

    Very informative article. The search option gives us one more tool to connect with those with the same interests. Thank you!

  • Autumn

    Anyone know if graph search works when using FB as a business page, and if so, how to go about it?

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    It’s similar, but early. That should be an interesting scenario — as Facebook ultimately helps businesses find leads. Stay tuned!

  • Joy Woo

    Probably a dumb question… But what’s the point of searching to include “Friends who like”? Is it to find who out of your friends has been to a place? What if you have friends that don’t “like” random pages? And who searches Facebook for hot topics?? Isn’t that what google is for? I can see what Facebook is doing, but is it really going to be successful.

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Not a dumb question at all. I think you’re asking a tough question actually. The point in its current iteration is for people to discover friends with similar interests or content that they’d like to find. All this data has been available in Facebook, but Edgerank and other parts of the product have actually made it harder for people to make discoveries.

    Graph Search helps with that. But… it’s really early. This will evolve over the next few years in some interesting ways.

    Thanks for your question/comment. :)

  • John Lawlor

    Excellent article on the opportunities presented by Facebook’s new graph search.

  • Pingback: Facebook Graph Search Review, How it Works | Social Media Examiner | Abir Roy

  • Geri Lafferty

    Wow. What a complete paper on Facebook’s graph search. Great job. Thanks for the details. This was really helpful!

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    :)

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Chris, thank you for covering this topic! I’ve also really enjoyed the discussion here in the comments. Even if it’s early days, it’s clear that Facebook’s new graph search could change the way marketers use Facebook… and even impact online marketing as a whole. I’m also interested to see how this will impact the way we all use Facebook in the future.

  • http://www.facebook.com/mikemerrill Mike D. Merrill

    Just glad to see my name showed up as a friend who likes bacon. Great post.

  • http://twitter.com/ARInayat Abdulrahman Inayat

    Thanks for such an amazing article!

    I just want to ask you how I can promote about other products of my clients or my company like ” Frank Hot Dogs ” ?

    How I can build pages for their products ? what do you suggest ?

    Thanks

    @Ab_inayat

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Thank you, Geri

  • marktennant

    Hey Chris, very nice article….but you see in the various groups, blogs, etc around the online world that say something like, ‘Getting Facebook Likes is Not a Social Media Strategy’. Well by God with Graph Search it sure sounds like it will be. Thoughts?…anyone?

  • http://twitter.com/MarkSeanElliott Mark S Elliott

    Great summary Chris! Many thanks.

    How do you get to test run Graph Search? I request to be on the Beta trial but no reply. Is it still only available to a select few?

    I look forward to a sensible dashboard for analytics and for placing ads via the network (current and graph search versions) will it ever come…..

  • Pingback: Top Online Marketing News February 15, 2013

  • Pingback: Online Marketing News: Fortune 100 Social B2B Brands, Vine Embeds Coming to Twitter?

  • Pingback: Online Marketing News: Fortune 100 Social B2B Brands, Vine Embeds Coming to Twitter? | Tips for the Unready

  • Pingback: Online Marketing News: Fortune 100 Social B2B Brands, Vine Embeds Coming to Twitter?

  • Pingback: Facebook Graph Search Review, How it Works | Online Media News

  • Pingback: Facebook Graph Search Review, How it Works | The Praxis Share

  • http://www.EntrepreneurOnFire.com/ John Lee Dumas

    Interesting post on Facebook graph search Chris! We all know that with Google there are different ways to optimize your brand on the search engine, how about with Facebook search graph? What do you think is the best way to make it to the top of the graph when people searched for words associated with my brand aside from the ones mentioned on the article like having more fans, stronger fan engagements, etc.,?

    I hope that they develop something similar to Twitter’s Hashtags that makes searching for keywords faster and easier. Though, I am not sure if that will work well with Facebook, but it’s just a thought. ;)

    Have a great day SME peeps!

    ~John Lee Dumas

  • Luis

    Great review of this facebook innovation, it will take some time until people realise its potential, but as marketer we should understand it from the beginning. Thanks for the feedback!

  • Pingback: Online Reputation and Social Media Management for Hotels: Recommended Readings of the week - February 15th | ReviewPro - ReviewPro

  • http://www.SelfEmployedKing.com/ Mike Kawula

    Great description. I could see this having a huge advantage to local small businesses who connect with there customers well on FB. Wonder what impact this will have on something like FourSquare w/ 30 million users when FB gets better with using all this data they have with all their users.

  • http://www.SelfEmployedKing.com/ Mike Kawula

    Great description. I could see this having a huge advantage to local small businesses who connect with there customers well on FB. Wonder what impact this will have on something like FourSquare w/ 30 million users when FB gets better with using all this data they have with all their users.

  • Pingback: Facebook Graph Search Review, How it Works « Waterway Realty's Weblog

  • Julie

    This is a good post. Unfortunately Graph Search does not work the way it is supposed to. I was one of the early people to get it and I wish everyday that I could switch back! The search bar is always hung up. I have to refresh my page a bunch of time just type in a friend’s FB page. Once they figure out all the kinks, I think it will be a good feature.

  • Julie

    This is a good post. Unfortunately Graph Search does not work the way it is supposed to. I was one of the early people to get it and I wish everyday that I could switch back! The search bar is always hung up. I have to refresh my page a bunch of time just type in a friend’s FB page. Once they figure out all the kinks, I think it will be a good feature.

  • Pingback: Online Marketing News: Fortune 100 Social B2B Brands, Vine Embeds Coming to Twitter? | My Blog

  • Pingback: Graph Search loves friends « Strategyaudit

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Great points, Mike. I think the business impact will be significant for lead generation and next-generation loyalty programs. The Graph is super powerful, no doubt. This is just the beginning IMO.

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Great points, Mike. I think the business impact will be significant for lead generation and next-generation loyalty programs. The Graph is super powerful, no doubt. This is just the beginning IMO.

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    News Feed Optimization has been the story for awhile now, but I can see it being replaced with Graph “discoverability” optimization later. Or at least Graph visibility may end up playing a bigger role.

    The thing to watch IMO moving forward is how text from the About section and other page profile data feeds Graph Search results. And how does Facebook tie all this to Mobile?

    I think you’re asking the right questions here.

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    News Feed Optimization has been the story for awhile now, but I can see it being replaced with Graph “discoverability” optimization later. Or at least Graph visibility may end up playing a bigger role.

    The thing to watch IMO moving forward is how text from the About section and other page profile data feeds Graph Search results. And how does Facebook tie all this to Mobile?

    I think you’re asking the right questions here.

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Facebook is adding people every day to Graph Search — so you should have access soon.

    Agree 100% that Insights isn’t terribly actionable or interesting. My company works on that problem. :)

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Facebook is adding people every day to Graph Search — so you should have access soon.

    Agree 100% that Insights isn’t terribly actionable or interesting. My company works on that problem. :)

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Agree — I think conventional wisdom always changes in this business. People who write blog posts like that are responding to the litany of bad advice that exists out there… but what was once a bad idea might end up being smart.

    Fans/Page Likes are not alone a sufficient outcome today, and that’s good advice today. But I can definitely see a future where Fan Count/Page Like Count is an important Edgerank and/or GraphSearchRank (my made up term) component and absolutely worth having.

    On that expertise/blogger point, that’s maybe more a result of an author optimizing for page views. It’s isn’t terribly insightful IMO to say that Fans/Page Likes are not a marketing strategy in and of itself. I agree, but think that point is rather obvious.

    I do think people should have a theory about where Facebook is going with certain features, however, and position clients/customers/self to take advantage of that reality in the future.

    Skate where the puck is going, don’t listen to someone describing where it currently is. :)

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Agree — I think conventional wisdom always changes in this business. People who write blog posts like that are responding to the litany of bad advice that exists out there… but what was once a bad idea might end up being smart.

    Fans/Page Likes are not alone a sufficient outcome today, and that’s good advice today. But I can definitely see a future where Fan Count/Page Like Count is an important Edgerank and/or GraphSearchRank (my made up term) component and absolutely worth having.

    On that expertise/blogger point, that’s maybe more a result of an author optimizing for page views. It’s isn’t terribly insightful IMO to say that Fans/Page Likes are not a marketing strategy in and of itself. I agree, but think that point is rather obvious.

    I do think people should have a theory about where Facebook is going with certain features, however, and position clients/customers/self to take advantage of that reality in the future.

    Skate where the puck is going, don’t listen to someone describing where it currently is. :)

  • http://marismith.com/ Mari Smith

    @twitter-6354062:disqus — humdinger post, my fab coauthor friend!! hehee

  • http://ideagirlmedia.com/ Keri at Idea Girl Media

    Chris,

    Great overview of Facebook Graph Search as it is relevant to business – Thanks for sharing your thoughts and findings!

    Your #6 above: “Status update and comment content is largely untapped as a data resource
    in this version of Graph Search. It’s a huge opportunity that will
    certainly make Graph Search a richer experience for users.”

    Could this be a reason Facebook is testing threaded comments? I’ve got that feature on my page, and I have to say two things: There is more conversation with this style of comments feature, and it would segment words/data by individual.

    Curious what you think.

    Thanks again,

    ~Keri

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    FB really needs to do threaded conversations — Twitter did it about a year ago and it helped their users. Really the status update and comment content are two very much untapped resources for marketers.

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    FB really needs to do threaded conversations — Twitter did it about a year ago and it helped their users. Really the status update and comment content are two very much untapped resources for marketers.

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    thank you Mari! :)

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    thank you Mari! :)

  • laurademeo

    Hello, Chris, great article– thank you for sharing a comprehensive info on Graph Search. My question is why do you think it will be more difficult to build a brand on Facebook? I am about to start a big project (long time vision) where we will be building a new brand and believe it has the potential to be a household name in the near future. But, I am planning to use Facebook as one of our branding strategies. What do you think the challenges will be to build a national brand using Facebook in the future? Thanks, Laura

  • Pingback: How Facebook Graph Search can Help Your Business - Codefetti Blog

  • Pingback: Facebook Graph Search Review, How it Works | Social Media Examiner - Catalyst Marketing - Catalyst Marketing

  • http://www.spinxwebdesign.com/ Spinx Inc

    Facebook Graph Search collects information from all possible sources and provides all related information for our search queries. It shows search result from people, pages, places, fan page and all other information on web.

  • http://www.spinxwebdesign.com/ Spinx Inc

    Facebook Graph Search collects information from all possible sources and provides all related information for our search queries. It shows search result from people, pages, places, fan page and all other information on web.

  • Pingback: Facebook's New Graph Search - The NALA Blog

  • Pingback: Helpful Links for Social Media Presentations | GSU Digital Production

  • Pingback: Online Marketing News: Fortune 100 Social B2B Brands, Vine Embeds Coming to Twitter? | Recruitment India

  • http://www.seosamuel.com/ Samuel King

    Thanks Chris for a well written and detailed review. Love the picture illustrations. This certainly takes a different approach to my explanation of the facebook graph on my blog. Are there any social marketers out there?, Facebook will be handing leads directly to you with little or no work on your part. What do you think?

  • Pingback: Graph Search- Week 1. | IMS News Discussion

  • Chris Powell

    Cool Stuff Chris. Your comments regarding lack of inclusion of Sonic, while Franks Hot Dogs fared better (pardon pun). I reckon it is because Franks Hot Dogs have Check-in’s enabled, while sonic does not. This highlights the need for franchise operators to establish their own facebook presence rather than relying on the master franchise’s efforts.

  • http://treadaway.typepad.com Chris Treadaway

    Plausible explanation — I’ll need to look into that.

    As for franchises, a lot of times the individual locations simply don’t have the bandwidth to manage social media daily. Even so, a centrally administered Facebook page could just as well enable check-ins. Makes you wonder if Facebook is indeed trying to get every location indexed on Facebook. A lot of franchises have tried to resist this because of the increased workload.

  • Pingback: Mind Sieve 2/25/13 | Gloria Oliver

  • Pingback: 5 Tips to Enhance Your Facebook Graph Search Ranking | Social Media Examiner

  • Pingback: Social Search: The 6 P’s Preventing its Penetration

  • Pingback: Online Marketing News: Fortune 100 Social B2B Brands, Vine Embeds Coming to Twitter? | SmartROI

  • Pingback: 10 Mobile Apps No Conference Attendee Should Be Without | Social Media Examiner

  • Pingback: Facebook Graph Search Primer | The 3V Blog

  • Pingback: Facebook Graph Search Review, How it Works | Social Media Examiner | Sharp Search Technologies

  • Pingback: Social Sales | Identifying the Decision Maker







Check out the Social Media Marketing Podcast!
Join our Social Media Marketing Networking Club
Download the free Social Media Marketing Industry Report
Get Your FREE Copy of the 2014 Social Media Marketing Industry Report
Wondering how your peers are using social media? Get this free report (50 pages, 80+ charts) and never miss another great article from Social Media Examiner.