How Brands Are Winning With Vine Videos: 10 Examples

social media how toDo you use Vine as part of your Twitter marketing?

Have you seen how other companies are using it?

Twitter originally introduced Vine to encourage creativity among users, but marketing teams quickly saw the value.

In this article I’ll show you 10 fun ways companies are using Vine in their Twitter marketing.

vine videos from 10 brands

Find ten examples of Vine video from brands.

#1: Dunkin’ Donuts’ Super Bowl Vine

Last year, during ESPN’s Monday Night Football pregame show, Dunkin’ Donuts unveiled the first television commercial made completely on Vine. It featured a team of Dunkin’ Donuts coffee cups taking on and defeating a team of milkshakes in a makeshift football game and was a huge hit.

Dunkin’ Donuts’ ground-breaking TV commercial targeted Monday Night Football’s large audience.

Dunkin’ Donuts kept their football momentum going when they released three more Vine commercials during the Super Bowl. Each one re-enacted memorable Super Bowl moments from years past—something the audience could appreciate. Genius.

#2: M&C Saatchi Sydney’s “Quit”

Brevity adds impact to hard-hitting agendas like this anti-smoking campaign. M&C Saatchi created several individual Vines to succinctly convey their message: stop smoking.

The six-second Vine simply reads, “Before this video restarts, another smoker will die.” Powerful stuff.

Six seconds is plenty of time to share your message.

Creative director Ant Melder said Vine was the best medium to spread the message because “Every six seconds, a smoker dies of smoking-related diseases.”

#3: Sony’s “Inception” Vine

This Vine from Sony is a play on the popular movie Inception. The ad whisks viewers inside the frame of the phone, into the phone inside that phone and then back again. The infinite loop of this ad is the kind of mind-boggling stuff people love.

Sony’s clever twist on pop culture drew attention to their new product.

The unexpected video shows off not just one, but two of Sony’s best products in a non-intrusive way. Don’t forget to look at the caption—it’s an exceptional Inception pun.

#4: Adidas’ World Cup Soccer Balls

Adidas’ clever Vine below shows the evolution of the World Cup soccer balls (or footballs for those of us outside the United States), from the 1970 design that debuted in Mexico, right up to this year’s polychrome ball that hurtled around the stadiums in Brazil.

Take advantage of popular current events.

The World Cup is always a huge draw. Adidas capitalized on the tournament’s popularity and global audience with this Vine.

#5: Disney’s “Show Your Disney Side” Competition

Disney initiated a Vine-based competition called Show Your Disney Side. They invited Disney fans to get creative with the Vine app and submit a video that reflects their true devotion to the brand.

The #disneyside Vine campaign brought out the creative side of fans.

Not that many people need an incentive to show their Disney side, but it didn’t hurt that daily winners received $1,000 and the grand prize winner received a free Disney vacation plus $10,000 funding for an extended Vine series. Overall, Disney’s Vine contest was a huge success and provided a way to gather creative user-generated ads to promote the company.

#6: Sesame Street’s “You Shall Not Pass!”

Sesame Street used this Vine to let Twitter followers know when to tune in for its Lord of the Rings spoof, “Lord of the Crumbs”—complete with the popular line from Gandalf’s encounter with the Balrog, “You shall not pass!”

Sesame Street appeals to adults and children with their fun spoof.

Sir Ian McKellen himself makes a surprise cameo appearance for a six-second téte-a-téte with his Muppet counterpart as he heads into the iconic Hooper’s store. This Sesame Street Vine is some real marketing wizardry.

#7: Airbnb’s “A Simple Journey”

Like Disney, Airbnb used a Vine marketing campaign to capitalize on consumer interaction. But rather than sift through thousands of Vines to pick daily- and grand-prize winners, they crowdsourced a whole bunch of them and created the first-ever short film made completely of Vines.

Combining several Vines into a short movie worked for Airbnb.

Airbnb’s completed film tracks a piece of paper as it journeys around the world (literally). The film debuted at the Sundance festival before it took the online world by storm.

#8: Oreo’s “All Cookies Must Dunk”

Oreo released this Vine, referencing the surprising death of a character from season 1 of Game of Thrones.

Oreo lost its head with this Vine campaign.

The company took one of the most popular lines from the show, “All men must die,” and put their signature twist on it: “All cookies must dunk.” Another social media win for Oreo.

#9: Volkswagen “Around the World”

In this walk down memory lane, the Volkswagen team tells the story of a 1955 Beetle that travelled the world three times and lived to tell the tale.

A clever trip around the world.

It’s obvious that the Vine is pieced together as a stop-motion collage of old photographs. But did you notice those pictures are arranged to show the Beetle doing a steady 360-degree rotation to show off its design? Brilliant.

#10: GE Science Lesson

General Electric asked, “How much science can you fit into 6 seconds?” and challenged people to create and submit science projects as Vines. Over 300 Vines were submitted—and they are so cool.

You don’t have to use the hard sell to get engagement.

GE’s Vine campaign fit with their science and technology culture and reinforced that science can be fun. They hosted the campaign on Tumblr (popular with the audience they were trying to reach) and included #6secondscience so viewers could keep up with submissions.

One reason the campaign worked so well is that while GE hosted the Vine event, it wasn’t an elaborate commercial. People were eager to contribute content that was shared far and wide.

Over to You

Since its official introduction in 2013, Vine has grown to be one of the best marketing tools for social media. In a Twitter stream filled (mostly) with text, these six-second videos stand out, especially if they’re funny.

The creative opportunities afforded by this simple app are endless. If you’re a social media marketer and haven’t tried Vine, what are you waiting for? They’re popular with audiences, so why not include them as a Twitter marketing tactic?

What do you think? Have you seen a particularly good marketing Vine? Have you used Vine as part of a campaign? Leave us your comments below and share the Vines you love.

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About the Author, Kristin Hodgkinson

Kristin Hodgkinson is brand development manager at Direct365, a company that specialises in providing business services to SMEs throughout the UK. Other posts by »




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  • http://www.keydifference.in suzy spring

    Awesome post. It’s really interesting while reading. These kinds of videos will be attracted more.







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