How to Connect Globally With Social Media

Do you know how to use social media to target a global audience?  After all, social media provides a low-cost solution to engage your prospects, customers and partners located in different regions of the world.

As Scott Monty, head of social media for Ford Motor Company, says, “U.S. brands looking to leverage social networks internationally know that while their messages need to stay consistent regardless of the region, the language, cultural reference points, platform and tactics, all need to be tailored for each market.”

He continues, “Whether it is customer service, IT, HR or product development, there are a number of uses for social media. And when you add to that all of our constituents—customers, employees, shareholders, dealers, retirees—it becomes a very complex assignment.”

Here’s a look at a few of the difficulties and how you can overcome them…

The Information Available

In the past, statistics on social media were difficult to come by and they were not always relevant.  But there are more Internet statistics available today even for social media.  McCann’s Wave 4 Power to the People report  is one resource available to gain insights into how to use social media internationally.

The trouble  with an international social media strategy, as Erik Qualman of Search Engine Watch points out, one size does not fit all. Having more relevant statistics does not get you very far.  You still need to learn how to adapt what you do on social media to effectively connect with people in other countries. And before you can do this, you need to know a bit more about what social media is like over there.

Social Media in Different Regions of the World

A good place to start is to look for general insights into the social media environment in the places you would like to reach.

The Nielsen report Global Faces and Networked Places clearly explains why localization has won the day in many countries and says, “Succeeding in China takes more than producing a translated version; it requires investment in a local infrastructure and a mentality of running a Chinese social network that understands the domestic nuances of social network behaviour rather than simply rolling out a generic social network in Chinese.”

Here are more insights from two social media players well-known in their own countries:

Have a look at this interview of Laurel Papworth in which she gives an analysis on what’s happening in social media in Australia and Southeast Asia.

Fred Cavazza says, “The main differences in France‘s social media are based on the local offering and local players: Dailymotion, Skyblog, Viadeo, Dofus, BlogSpirit, CanalBlog, OverBlog… and there are 3 distinct groups in France around culinary, political and IT gadget blogs.”

Fred Cavazza raises a good point. Let’s have a look at the main challenges presented by local offerings and local players.  These are areas where you will need to adapt to fit in with what works in the local social media environment.

Cultural Differences in How People Respond to Social Media

Cultural differences always impact how people use social media. Here are some insights from a few culturally minded social media players.

Engagement—Jack Yan says, “There seems to be a gap between Americans and New Zealanders on Twitter usage, for instance. Kiwis, for the most part, seem to engage a bit more and there are relatively fewer accounts, proportionally, made up of automated tweets. There seems to be more of a demand on American tweeters, for instance, to provide a lot of content, and I suspect that this drives the automation. This arguably comes back to the different cultures: one historically more collaborative, the other historically more individualistic.

Hesitation—France shares a trait with many countries: hesitation and observation before engaging in new social media. Thierry de Baillon says, “Where Anglo Saxons are prone to quickly dive into new platforms and get new habits, Frenchies stick with old ones, watching others acting while taking their time.”

Networking—Lucy Chatburn sees more networking activity on both LinkedIn and Facebook in Turkey than in the UK. “This could be because networking doesn’t come naturally to many British people. And a LinkedIn profile is definitely not seen as an essential career tool in the UK.”

Shyness—Mixi, a leading social network in Japan, added a special feature to make it easier for people to make friends.

Of course, there are many more ways cultural differences impact social media. Before you can find the right way for your business to connect with people on social media platforms in different countries, you do need to:

  • Develop cultural awareness
  • Do your research
  • Adapt your communication and social approach

Evolution in Local Players

Other challenges in international social media are related to changes in popularity of social media platforms.  A snapshot of the social media environment in any country may not remain current for long.  Social media environments change.

Facebook’s growth has had an impact on many countries outside of North America. Orkut’s popularity in Brazil and India is changing.

This is why it is difficult for businesses to know how to:

  • Anticipate where to spend time
  • Identify the most relevant social media platforms for their business

Good monitoring practices and a local presence are keys to success.

Can Social Media Help Your International Business?

There are many reasons why this is a tough question to answer.  As we have seen above, statistics do not always reflect how people use social media. There are also:

  • Different speeds of adopting social media
  • Differences in how locals use social media
  • Differences in how businesses can use social media in different countries

On the one hand, local statistics can be misleading.  Another culturally minded social media player, Martin Lindeskog points out that “The broadband/high-speed Internet connection is very common here in Sweden.” However, he also notes that “you can’t find many examples of companies that have embraced a new type of media strategy in full scale yet. There is a lot of talk about Twitter, but you don’t see many companies microblogging.

On the other hand, although statistics only tell part of the story, a detailed view of the local social media environment can give you valuable insights.  According to Fred Cavazza, the social media market in France was evangelized long ago by local players, and this made the road to success easy to maneuver for Facebook in France.

Successful International Social Media

If you are serious about using social media within an international marketing strategy, you will need:

  • Strong cross-cultural skills
  • Local professionals

The right people will help you through the complexity in finding:

  • Preferred offers
  • Communication preferences
  • Use of different platforms
  • Where and how the people you want to reach use social media in their country

A Source of Inspiration

In addition to connecting with business networking partners abroad, there is another good reason to keep an ear open for what is happening in international social media: there is richness in diversity.  And this can help you stay in tune with social media as it evolves for everyone.

Monitoring how businesses in other countries use social media helps you to:

  • Get ideas for new things to try in your own country
  • Spot new trends in other areas of the world which might, in time, affect your own industry

As different people around the world adapt social media to their own cultural tastes and the driving forces in their local markets, we are sure to see:

  • More innovation
  • Different uses for social media in business
  • Opportunities to adapt the strategies and tools we are familiar with to new international markets

Observing these changes and understanding why they fail or succeed increase our understanding of what social media is all about.  Although North American businesses are using social media more than businesses elsewhere, there are many examples of innovation and inspiration to be found outside of North America.  This alone is why following international social media is useful to many businesses.

Now, over to you…

  • What have you learned by observing social media in other countries?
  • What is the most interesting difference in international social media to you?
  • What anecdotes can you share about social media in different countries?

Please share your comments with us below.

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About the Author, Cindy King

Cindy King is the director of editorial for Social Media Examiner. She spent 25 years abroad in international business development and then built her own international business from scratch by using social business networking. Other posts by »




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  • http://www.culturalrealms.com/2009/07/the-thracian-civilization-the-best-of-cultural-tourism-country-branding-for-bulgaria.html Rossitza Ohridska-Olson

    Cindy, great post. Yes, there are differences in the usage of the social networks, as well as in building socialn networks. MoyKrug.ru, for example, is a mix between linkedin.com, myspace.com and facebook.com. I am just wondering, isn’t the facebook approach more logical – concentrate in the same space more people and manage one profile and all the apps? Or go local for each country and have an entire department for managing social presence?

    For business usage, I would recommend the second. For personal – only one place, specially if this one place has localization tools, like for example facebook.

    BTW, what do you think about automated localization tools? I personally hate them – I don’t want the computer to deduce from my IP address what language I prefer to be communicated to, or where to search for a product and service. This summer was horrible with Facebook, when I had to go and switch everything back into English from Bulgarian. Last summer – I couldn’t find US/Canadian products, because no matter what I was saying to Google (search the web, versus search only in…) I still was getting first results European products, and had to dig pages after pages until finding a US hotel reservation system to recommend to my EU client.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hi Rossitza,

    You make a very good distinction between using different approaches on Facebook depending on whether you use it for business or personal networking. And I would definitely agree with you for my own business.

    I had a good chuckle with your question about automated localization tools. I hate them too. Beyond that, I cannot think of any business reasons big enough to impose it on us. I do believe there might be legal reasons in some regions.

    I used to read John Yunker regularly on this, but I’m not up to speed on the latest developments. I think there are more variations out there today than last year for example.. some of the ones I come across are not too bad: you feel the corporate wish to shove you down a particular cultural slide, but there is a loop hole for you to tell them what you want… and with a little luck they will listen to your wish long enough for you to get things done.

    BTW – I know that my own computer settings also like to take control of IP search results… particularly after an upgrade.

  • http://www.virtualityworks.com/ Susan Weeks

    As an english person living in France, I too hate automated localisation tools – I often get ‘offered’ a site in french when actually I want to see it in english. I can read and speak french but its much faster for me in english. When will companies get the message that country of location and preferred langage are not the same thing? I agree with the comment about French people preferring to observe and wait rather than leap into anything, but that is changing with the younger generation who seem just as interested in new things as any other nation. Interesting post – Cheers

  • http://YourMoneyDrawer.com Bill Rice

    This is a great topic Cindy.

    Our reach, with social media and online publishing in general, becomes almost instantly global. I know I am guilty of being oblivious of (and therefore probably lose) my International audience.

    As you highlight the Web gives us a great opportunity to observe the social norms and behaviors of other regions. I will have to do a bit more research to improve my own performance.

    I like how you mention the speed of adoption. I bet opportunities already lost or taken in the US might be very fertile in a different region. Another thing to consider.

  • http://thecrossculturalconnector.com/ amsall

    Awesome post as usual, Cindy. This comes exactly at the time I need it the most – for my upcoming blogsite and book “The Cross-cultural Connector”. I’ve followed ALL the links in this post, plus most of the links inside wherever those links took me LOL. One way to find out about the most popular networking sites in various countries could be Linkedin answers or Yahoo answers. I think Scott Monty’s list is a bit old (2008, and things go very fast in the e-world!). Congratulations, Cindy. Thanks a lot for the great work you’re doing and please keep on churning out the goodies :-)

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hi Susan, I’m actually looking forward to observing how the younger generations change things. I think these changes will be different in different countries. And you’re right, we are starting to see these changes already.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hi Bill, here in France I notice the French people who “copy” American concepts to create businesses. It happens often enough.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hello Amsall, Thank you for your comments and tips. I’m sure you have lots of insights to share on international social media marketing!

  • http://sellbetter.ca/blog Tibor Shanto

    Hi Cindy,

    Great points to consider, one of the things I am always looking for is the balance between local and global. While there are many Canadians on the mainstream global social sites, many people I want to connect with prefer close to home sites. Thanks for sharing.

    Tibor

  • http://www.ospreyvision.com/blog Steve Finikiotis

    Interesting post, Cindy. I think the recommendations are sound. It’s important to gear our communications for their intended markets. Regional differences in business applications for social media are, in some case, profound.

    There are also obvious differences between developed and developing markets. Variations like Hofstede’s “power distance” come into play as those influenced by social media adoption rates. These variations are less pronounced in B2B environments. All of these factors are important considerations in any cross-market communications. Thanks again, Cindy, for highlighting these issues.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hi Tibor, thanks for your comments about people preferring close to home sites. This is one of the reasons why localization is always important in international marketing… online or offline.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hi Steve, thank you for your thoughtful comments on the differences between developed and developing markets. It’s fascinating times for international business developers like us.

  • http://www.tamar.com/ Milly Diaz-Tamar.com

    Commentor Susan Weeks makes an interesting point – the younger generation in France approach things much differently to their ‘elders’. Are regional/cultural differences less pronounced with digital natives?

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Milly, different generations approach things differently on many different levels in many cultures, not only in France… and even more so with regards to anything related to the web. In addition, things are still evolving. I would approach this more in terms of “trends” right now for many cultures and be very careful of any assumptions.This is one of the reasons why the cultural generalizations people used 30 years ago are not always very useful today. There are just too many variables.

  • http://www.CompassNorthInc.com/ Tony Johnston

    Cindy,Thanks for giving us the bigger picture with this great post of yours. I particularly found the Laurel Papworth video interview very informative.Talking about making global connections, I have a question for you. What are your views about language in international cross cultural communications? Despite being a Canadian, the only language I can communicate in with any degree of sophistication is English. But what are you seeing in the use of other languages such as French and Chinese to name but two? Is English the predominant social media langauge of e-communication and what if any accommodation should one make for the other languages being used on the web today?Tony Johnston<a

  • http://www.CompassNorthInc.com/ Tony Johnston

    Cindy,Thanks for giving us the bigger picture with this great post of yours. I particularly found the Laurel Papworth video interview very informative.Talking about making global connections, I have a question for you. What are your views about language in international cross cultural communications? Despite being a Canadian, the only language I can communicate in with any degree of sophistication is English. But what are you seeing in the use of other languages such as French and Chinese to name but two? Is English the predominant social media langauge of e-communication and what if any accommodation should one make for the other languages being used on the web today?Tony Johnston<a

  • Anonymous

    Great post Cindy really makes me think. Some of these sites I’ve never heard of and I think that confirms the UK situation of being a bit ‘anti-social’!! There is still a lot of suspicion here generally. As far as language goes there isn’t an issue I suppose. I am a confirmed twitter affiliate but I do wonder whether the whole language thing makes this less accessible to those for whom English isn’t an option. Also those using other languages might feel a bit ghettoised? Just a thought.

  • Anonymous

    Great post Cindy really makes me think. Some of these sites I’ve never heard of and I think that confirms the UK situation of being a bit ‘anti-social’!! There is still a lot of suspicion here generally. As far as language goes there isn’t an issue I suppose. I am a confirmed twitter affiliate but I do wonder whether the whole language thing makes this less accessible to those for whom English isn’t an option. Also those using other languages might feel a bit ghettoised? Just a thought.

  • Ralston Champagnie

    Cindy presents a comprehensive understanding of what it takes to turn potential customers on the global scene into international brand hugging. Having born and raised in Jamaica, I totally agree that networking does not come naturally to many people from the British Commonwealth Nations.

  • Ralston Champagnie

    Cindy presents a comprehensive understanding of what it takes to turn potential customers on the global scene into international brand hugging. Having born and raised in Jamaica, I totally agree that networking does not come naturally to many people from the British Commonwealth Nations.

  • http://www.wchingya.com wchingya

    Thanks to Laurel, I learned a great deal about social media abroad and how people are using them. Friendster is indeed very famous here in Malaysia since about 3 or 4 years ago when we all have a yahoo & Friendster account. Gradually Facebook starts to pick up and now most of the bigger companies are embracing FB; my friends are pretty much enjoying the ‘farming’ game & apps on FB too. Somehow the ability to customize a Friendster profile page doesn’t seem appealing to them anymore. Social media evolution is definitely on the rise here and soon, more demands gonna come.

    What I amazed about international social media is the initiative and investment people/companies are willing to put in them. The variety is growing, but the ability to identify your potential application(s) for positive results is what matters most.

  • http://www.wchingya.com wchingya

    Thanks to Laurel, I learned a great deal about social media abroad and how people are using them. Friendster is indeed very famous here in Malaysia since about 3 or 4 years ago when we all have a yahoo & Friendster account. Gradually Facebook starts to pick up and now most of the bigger companies are embracing FB; my friends are pretty much enjoying the ‘farming’ game & apps on FB too. Somehow the ability to customize a Friendster profile page doesn’t seem appealing to them anymore. Social media evolution is definitely on the rise here and soon, more demands gonna come.

    What I amazed about international social media is the initiative and investment people/companies are willing to put in them. The variety is growing, but the ability to identify your potential application(s) for positive results is what matters most.

  • Anonymous

    Very interesting observations in the post and the comments; In my corner of the Caribbean – St. Lucia and Barbados, social media adoption is really just starting as far as business is concerned. I know many of the young people in St. Lucia used Hi-5 to put up personal sites, MySpace as well and now more are on FB. Twitter is less used – just a few days ago a twitter friend made the comment that he’d love to see more Eastern Caribbean people using Twitter; well there are people registered but ‘using’ Twitter, not really, and most Caribbean users still just socialize online wherever they are.That said, I am so convinced about the potential of social media for business in the Caribbean – we are hampered by being tiny local markets (50-150,000 populations) and by high costs of travel to anywhere, even our own region; the opportunity of social media, to converse with anywhere in the world at very little cost, offers huge potential, and must be one of the few equal playing fields we can operate on. Our social and business makeup though, does not embrace innovation generally, so whether we are able to, maybe through the younger generation, get on board and ride the wave, is yet to be seen. I think this will be a case where a few adopters will have to prove the point and show the way. I hope to be one of them (even if I’m not ‘the younger generation:) and for sure I’ll keep promoting this route, and for that, look forward to your continued work and guidance Cindy!

    Finola Prescott

  • Anonymous

    Very interesting observations in the post and the comments; In my corner of the Caribbean – St. Lucia and Barbados, social media adoption is really just starting as far as business is concerned. I know many of the young people in St. Lucia used Hi-5 to put up personal sites, MySpace as well and now more are on FB. Twitter is less used – just a few days ago a twitter friend made the comment that he’d love to see more Eastern Caribbean people using Twitter; well there are people registered but ‘using’ Twitter, not really, and most Caribbean users still just socialize online wherever they are.That said, I am so convinced about the potential of social media for business in the Caribbean – we are hampered by being tiny local markets (50-150,000 populations) and by high costs of travel to anywhere, even our own region; the opportunity of social media, to converse with anywhere in the world at very little cost, offers huge potential, and must be one of the few equal playing fields we can operate on. Our social and business makeup though, does not embrace innovation generally, so whether we are able to, maybe through the younger generation, get on board and ride the wave, is yet to be seen. I think this will be a case where a few adopters will have to prove the point and show the way. I hope to be one of them (even if I’m not ‘the younger generation:) and for sure I’ll keep promoting this route, and for that, look forward to your continued work and guidance Cindy!

    Finola Prescott

  • http://www.travelwriter.at/ Travelwriticus

    Interesting to read. It makes me aware how complicated Global Social Media really is. It would be interesting for me to know how to budget all these efforts? Most people I know in Austria try to make its ‘own’ dedicated blog for their business. No budget but probably no results either.

  • http://www.travelwriter.at/ Travelwriticus

    Interesting to read. It makes me aware how complicated Global Social Media really is. It would be interesting for me to know how to budget all these efforts? Most people I know in Austria try to make its ‘own’ dedicated blog for their business. No budget but probably no results either.

  • Anonymous

    I forgot to say that a recent report put St. Lucia’s broadband connectivity and use at about 66% of households, Barbados at 68% (as best as I can remember), so we’re very connected, but really we don’t use social media or even ‘traditional’ websites for business hardly at all.

    Having the whole banking system unable (or unwilling?) to process online payments doesn’t help, but perhaps in the context of this article, more interestingly, we are all so business-culturally different, island to island – so what’s happening in Barbados for instance,where businesses do make use of the internet and are doing so increasingly well, is not happening in St. Lucia at all. Trinidad and Jamaica are hot on news and political and social blogging, people in St. Lucia will not comment on online newspaper sites using their real names…
    Even for those of us in the region it can be difficult to figure out what approach to take!
    Finola

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    It’s an interesting question. If you speak English, I personally would not worry about language too much if you are already in business, but I would probably say something different to college or university students.

    English has traditionally been the international business language for a long time… but we may see this change in the future.

    If you really want to develop your international business you will need to develop international skills. Even if basic language skills can be useful for certain cultures, strong cross-cultural skills are what you really need.

    I’ve met many people who spoke a foreign language to a fairly decent basic level and yet had no cross-cultural communication skills and no skills in getting international business.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    It’s an interesting question. If you speak English, I personally would not worry about language too much if you are already in business, but I would probably say something different to college or university students.

    English has traditionally been the international business language for a long time… but we may see this change in the future.

    If you really want to develop your international business you will need to develop international skills. Even if basic language skills can be useful for certain cultures, strong cross-cultural skills are what you really need.

    I’ve met many people who spoke a foreign language to a fairly decent basic level and yet had no cross-cultural communication skills and no skills in getting international business.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hi Berni! It still seems strange to me to hear Brits being referred to as “anti-social”. I don’t think so. They’re just social in different ways…

    If only we could look at the most popular social media platforms in the UK five years from now, they may be different from the US favorites… or at least used differently.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hi Berni! It still seems strange to me to hear Brits being referred to as “anti-social”. I don’t think so. They’re just social in different ways…

    If only we could look at the most popular social media platforms in the UK five years from now, they may be different from the US favorites… or at least used differently.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hi Ralston, Now you’ve got me imagining what Caribbean flavored social media networking would be like!

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Hi Ralston, Now you’ve got me imagining what Caribbean flavored social media networking would be like!

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Ching Ya, you’ve made some very interesting points here.

    It’s interesting to me to note which non-native English speaking countries adopt the bigger platforms. And which cultures prefer social media with their own cultural flavor almost right from the start.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Ching Ya, you’ve made some very interesting points here.

    It’s interesting to me to note which non-native English speaking countries adopt the bigger platforms. And which cultures prefer social media with their own cultural flavor almost right from the start.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Finola, thanks for taking the time to provide us with so many interesting insights.

    I expect there will be more opportunities for international business development for some professions or industries on the islands at some point in the future. But I do hear you, when you point out the cultural differences in how we behave online and how this can limit opportunities in some countries.

    There might also be an element of being a little bit behind in adopting social media. It’s going to be interesting to see how things unfold in the future.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Finola, thanks for taking the time to provide us with so many interesting insights.

    I expect there will be more opportunities for international business development for some professions or industries on the islands at some point in the future. But I do hear you, when you point out the cultural differences in how we behave online and how this can limit opportunities in some countries.

    There might also be an element of being a little bit behind in adopting social media. It’s going to be interesting to see how things unfold in the future.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Andreas, we’ll have more here on Social Media Examiner about how to go about setting up blogging and social media for business.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Andreas, we’ll have more here on Social Media Examiner about how to go about setting up blogging and social media for business.

  • http://www.bloggertone.com Niall Devitt

    Hi Cindy, great post! I think that the points about the effect that cultural difference has in terms of engagement is very interesting indeed. I have definitely noticed differences here (Ireland) and internationally. It is not something that you may think of in the first instance but it’s extremely relevant. Regards, Niall

  • http://www.bloggertone.com Niall Devitt

    Hi Cindy, great post! I think that the points about the effect that cultural difference has in terms of engagement is very interesting indeed. I have definitely noticed differences here (Ireland) and internationally. It is not something that you may think of in the first instance but it’s extremely relevant. Regards, Niall

  • http://www.bloggertone.com Niall Devitt

    Hi Cindy, great post! I think that the points about the effect that cultural difference has in terms of engagement is very interesting indeed. I have definitely noticed differences here (Ireland) and internationally. It is not something that you may think of in the first instance but it’s extremely relevant. Regards, Niall

  • Shaun Gisbourne

    A company I’ve been working with in France seems to have no social media strategy at the moment and the question that goes around my head is: “Do their clients have one?” – These are big clients with multi-site presence nationally and internationally in some cases.

    Two businesses that are definitely helping smaller and larger organisations respectively to great effect with their social media are http://www.nikkipilkington.com and http://www.marketsentinel.com

  • http://twitter.com/Pureveggie Jiyoon Choi

    Cindy, this is a truly thought-provoking topic.

    As a Korean living in New York, it is quite challenging to mingle with my friends via Facebook; not only because of the language barrier, but because of the cultural gap. Koreans typically use Cyworld (www.cyworld.com) instead of Facebook. The biggest difference between these two social media websites is the way we express ourselves. At Cyworld, people decorate their homepage with diverse paid-items such as wallpapers, fonts, and music to express their identities. In this regard, Facebook seemed relatively simple to me the first time I logged on. Yet, its “wall” system encourages me to communicate with others in a more direct and mutual way, which is great. I think these distinctions come from cultural differences between two countries in terms of self-portraying and socializing. Thus, I agree that having strong cross-cultural skills and local professionals are crucial to succeed when it comes to overseas market. Thank you for the great post.

  • http://www.gucciwebbag.com gucci web

    we are all so business-culturally different, island to island – so what’s happening in Barbados for instance,where businesses do make use of the internet and are doing so increasingly well, is not happening in St. Lucia at all.

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