5 Ways to Keep Your Facebook Page Secure

social media how toIs your Facebook page secure? With such a critical marketing tool, are you keeping your virtual house locked and safe?

With so much focus on managing the wall and running promotions, Facebook page security is often overlooked.

The good news is that Facebook’s security is actually quite effective. SSL encryption greatly reduces the chance of a page being hacked by a malicious script to take over the page or bypass its content.

However, while Facebook’s security from external threats is great, there are still threats that every page admin needs to be aware of.

So here are five ways to keep your page safe and secure.

#1: Moderate your page’s admins

Many companies collect page admins over time because they fail to remove old ones. Add up the social media managers, graphic artists, web designers and even interns, and pages can have dozens of admins.

However, administrative privileges to your business Facebook page should only be granted to a handful of people and only for as long as necessary.

admins

Keep the number of your page admins small, ensuring that only necessary, current personnel have admin access.

I once did some design work for a company’s Facebook page, so I was given admin privileges. I was shocked to find they had nearly 40 admins, most of them student interns who were only with the company for a semester.

Years later, these former interns still had the same permissions as they did during their internships. Any of these people could, at any time, post new content to the page, remove content and change admin privileges for others.

Because admin privileges give an individual so much power over a company’s image and online presence, manage your admins as closely as possible.

It’s a best practice for companies to write Facebook admin rules into their HR policy: If a person is no longer involved in a Facebook project, their admin privileges need to be removed immediately, and whenever an admin leaves the company, their admin privileges need to be removed immediately.

#2: Be App-rehensive

Do research before you use a third-party application on your page. You need to know what information the app accesses and make sure the developing company is as committed to security as you are, because if they get hacked, your information could be compromised.

Any upstanding app will use SSL encryption, segregated databases, cloud-based redundancy, expiring passwords and expiring data purges, so look for these precautions from your third-party apps.

You also need to make sure the app doesn’t ask for more information or access than it needs. There are many “spammy” apps that provide limited functionality, but ask for lots of information and access.

If an app that does nothing more than pose a poll question wants access to your fans, the ability to post to your wall and a dozen other things, look elsewhere. A simple app with simple functionality doesn’t need all that permission.

allow app permission

Apps that require extensive permission also require extensive scrutiny on your part.

However, if you’re using something like a custom tab app, expect it to ask for advanced permissions. But clarify with the developer or the company what they’re doing with the information they access, why they need the permissions they’re seeking and inquire about the security precautions they take.

#3: Change and protect your password

I can’t imagine anyone in this day and age not reading that headline and thinking “well, duh.” Everyone knows they’re supposed to change their passwords regularly, and to something that’s obscure enough to throw even themselves.

However, there are so many instances of stolen passwords, I’d like to take it a step further: Never use the same password for two different web platforms.

Remember the PlayStation Network debacle from 2011? No matter how careful you are with your passwords, your information can be stolen if a website you use regularly gets hacked. So if that message board you post on or your fantasy sports league’s website gets hacked, and you use that same login and password for Facebook, your page could easily be hacked.

It does get tricky managing numerous passwords and changing them frequently, so sign up for a password management program like Passpack to keep things straight.

passpack

Save time when logging into online accounts with the Passpack It! login button. Works on your iPhone, iPad and Android too.

#4: Moderate the wall

This might not seem like security in the classic sense, but your page needs to be safe for your users; which means you, the admin, need to be active on your page. If you’re working for a big brand with thousands of fans but you aren’t moderating the wall, opportunistic scammers can take note and post malicious links or content that undermine your brand’s image or reputation.

Then your wall fills up with links to help an African prince post bail (he’ll repay you several hundred-fold, honest!), get a credit report (just enter your credit card info!) and lose weight fast (just visit this site to… whoops, you’ve got malware!).

Most Facebook users are savvy enough to recognize a scam, but you don’t want your fans to even have to think about clicking a link on your wall. So moderate all posts to your wall and make your page a safe place for your fans to visit.

#5: Take advantage of Facebook’s Blocklists

Along the lines of providing a safe haven for your fans, use Facebook’s Moderation Blocklists to keep undesirable content off of your wall.

Click on “Edit Page” and then “Manage Permissions” to access and update your list. Simply type in the words you want filtered out and the Moderation Blocklist will screen not just your fans’ posts, but comments to posts as well. All blocked content shows up in a spam folder that’s visible to you, but not your fans.

blocklist

Keep undesired content off of your wall with Facebook's Blocklists.

While you’re at it, try adding some “spammy” keywords that have nothing to do with your brand.

What do you think? Leave your questions and comments in the box below.

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About the Author, Jim Belosic

Jim Belosic is the CEO of ShortStack, a self-service software that allows businesses to create engaging campaigns for social, web and mobile. Other posts by »




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  • Lea Schizas

    Thank you for the very informative article.

  • Ravi Shukle

    Thanks for the great tips, now if only Facebook could release a filter whereby we could block certain materials being posted on our pages ie videos containing adult material/violence etc this could be done through keywords and needs to be released soon.

  • Ann

    Thanks for the helpful tips!!!

  • http://www.socialwebmarketing.mx/ Ruben Castellanos

    Very good tips thanks for the very good information, keep sharing good tips

  • Dan

    Upon removing an admin, my entire wall reset itself, and I lot a ton of posts I would have preferred to keep.
    It was not that he was the one who posted those things.  No idea, but hesitant to do it again… 

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  • Gerry Praysman

    Great tips, Jim! I’ve been hearing a lot of good things about Passpack so now I’m determined to give it a try.

    I actually created a presentation on Facebook security a little while back from a great e-book (this is for personal accounts, not business pages). I figured it might be helpful since there seems to be some overlap: http://my.brainshark.com/A-Guide-to-Facebook-Security-968352486
     

  • Rebecca Falconer

    Thanks, that article was really helpful.

  • JimBelosic

    Ravi, that would be a great feature!

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  • JimBelosic

    Hey Dan-

    That’s puzzling. Could you send me an email with a link to your Page so I could take a look at it? contact@shortstacklab.com

    Thanks!
    Jim

  • http://learnit2earnitwithlynn.com Lynn Brown

    Great tips Jim!  I am glad you mention to be careful with all those apps.  Especially if you are security minded.  And changing your password is another thing many business owners don’t think to do.  I had my FB account taken down at the beginning of the year because of someone hacking into my account.  Took 3 days and finally Facebook let me back in.  But now I change my password every 3 – 4 months.  Might be a pain, but (knock on wood) I have not had any problems since.

  • http://twitter.com/Think_eBiz eBiz Solutions

    Thanks for sharing the great  tips!

  • http://www.i95dev.com/ecommerce-magento Henry Louis

    Hi Jim! Well suggested. Maintenance of Facebook page security is very important to protect the data. I hope these 5 tips are very helpful in keeping our Facebook page very secure. Nice post. Keep updating.

  • http://www.dailytrader.com/ Global Wholesale Suppliers

    Moderating you facebook page and changing your password are the best practices in which from these all. Other 3 things are also important but according to me these two are very important. You must be updated as well so that the traffic could be increase at your website. Nice information in a ll the way. 

  • One_Finger_short_of_a_Hand

    It amazes me that there are large brands that might not be moderating their wall, even just from the point of view of revealing that their page is ‘live’. To be honest i have not seen these spammers on any FB pages, but I am not a big user… YouTube seems to be their playground!

    Password changing is such a nuisance and you sometimes wonder whether there is anywhere safe to store those forgetable combinations…. I still prefer a scrap of paper for those really important ones

  • Michael Murray

    Thanks for the tips Jim! I wonder if Facebook has an ‘admin-lite’ feature that would allow someone the ability to post on the wall as the page, update settings, etc but not change admins and other important security features. I’m not aware of anything like this. If anyone is I’d love to know. Maybe someday Facebook will unveil a feature like this?

  • http://josephjyoung.com/ Joseph Young

    Hi Jim,
    In this day and age it is best to not overlook these 5 ways, especially when it comes to moderating your own wall. Spammers are everywhere, posting everything from shoes, bras, and insurance. Unbelievable! I am dealing with this issue now with regards to the app I use for the Welcome tab. FB says it does not support secure browsing. A learning curve but that is business.

    thanks for sharing,
    Joe

  • Karen THE Connector

    Very Simple so anyone using facebook could use this information.

  • JimBelosic

    That’s a great point that a lot of people fail to consider, Lynn- it might be a pain to change your password, but not changing your password causes even more headaches!

  • JimBelosic

    You’re absolutely right Karen, these are simple, simple ways for every admin to keep his or her Page secure.

  • patelanjali

    The good news is that Facebook’s security is actually quite effective.
    SSL encryption greatly reduces the chance of a page being hacked by a
    malicious script to take over the page or bypass its content.

  • Rose Walker

    Timely reminders as we head into the new year!  Thank you for sharing.

  • http://socialweblearning.com/ Sheila Hensley

    Love your article, Jim!  Forced me to evaluate my password system, re-check my FB page and really notice what was going on.  No more passive attitude.  Great advice, thanks.

  • http://www.vidstowatch.com/ Sam

     Thanks for this Jim. Now that the following my blog gets on Facebook, these tips will definitely come in handy. #2 is a big one! I had a friend that had allow an app access to his profile and it just started spamming all his followers

  • http://www.facebook.com/San.Diego.Marketing.USA San Diego Marketing

    I’m definitely all for moderating the brand’s Facebook wall. I’ve seen so many annoying spam posts from random users and passerbys, and letting it flood a timeline is just a nuisance.

  • http://www.businessmasterygroup.com/ Web Design El Paso

    Good point discussed.
    Nice sharing.

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  • http://www.dailymorningcoffee.com Praveen Rajarao

    Nicely listed out points about the security of FB. These social networking sites are picking up so drastically that one should think twice before creating a profile and sharing stuff online.

  • Francis Ogundipe

    I like the tips. Reasonable and educating. Keep it up.

  • Pingback: 5 Ways to Keep Your Facebook Page Secure | Media For Churches

  • Customersupport

    Thanks for the helpful information, Jim!

  • lej

    my previous web designer removed me from being an administrator on my own Facebook page.  how do i rectify the situation?

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  • http://kathypop.com/ Kathy Pop

    I’d like to add one more tip ALWAYS have more than 1 admin. If you should lose your personal profile or FB decides to lock out out of you page ( say for violating their TOS) you need to have another admin so you do not lose access to the page. You can create another persona – People often create profiles using pen names.Or add a trusted friend as an admin.
    I just heard from a couple people that almost lost their page due to the person/ company they hired to do ads for them violated FB’s TOS. One woman told me that she lost her personal profile thru some glitch and now cannot access her page.

  • http://kathypop.com/ Kathy Pop

    I’d like to add one more tip ALWAYS have more than 1 admin. If you should lose your personal profile or FB decides to lock out out of you page ( say for violating their TOS) you need to have another admin so you do not lose access to the page. You can create another persona – People often create profiles using pen names.Or add a trusted friend as an admin.
    I just heard from a couple people that almost lost their page due to the person/ company they hired to do ads for them violated FB’s TOS. One woman told me that she lost her personal profile thru some glitch and now cannot access her page.

  • calvinholbrook

    Thanks for the tips! I work for an online LGBT community and receive so many posts on our wall with Blackberry pin numbers, Whatsapps etc… and I have to delete all of these manually as there is a potential for members to try and add people on Facebook then ask for money. Are there any smart tools available for me to deal with this rather than manually? Thanks!







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