How Content Marketing Builds Trusted Relationships

social media expert interviewIn this video I interview C.C. Chapman, co-author of Content Rules.

C.C. explains why content marketing is important for businesses and the role it plays in building trusted relationships. He also shares how businesses can create stories to connect with customers.

Be sure to check out the takeaways below after you watch the video.

Here are some of the things you’ll learn in this video:

  • How to stand out above the stream of content online
  • Discover C.C.’s favorite case study of successful content marketing
  • How you can build relationships with your customers through the content you publish
  • Why it’s important for businesses to tell stories
  • How guidelines can help you create a successful content strategy
  • How great content can impact your business
  • How to tell stories with your content
  • How the real-time trend will impact stories and content marketing
  • Why filters are needed to find the good content

Connect with C.C. on Twitter @cc_chapman, on Facebook and check out C.C.’s blog.

Do you use strategic content marketing for your business? If so, what tips do you have to share? Please leave them below.

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About the Author, Michael Stelzner

Michael Stelzner is the founder and CEO of Social Media Examiner, founder of My Kids' Adventures and author of the books Launch and Writing White Papers. He's also the host of the Social Media Marketing podcast. Other posts by »




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  • http://www.cc-chapman.com/ C.C. Chapman

    Glad this is live and it was fun to sit down and have this discussion.

    Thank you for asking me to do it. See you soon at Blogworld.

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Thanks C.C.!  You are one smart dude :)

  • http://twitter.com/jordanrunsit Jordan Smallwood

    I really liked this interview. I wish that all PR/Marketing executives could watch this interview if they haven’t already read the book. Many businesses fail to realize that having a great relationship with their customers through their content in addition to overall transparency is what generates customer interest and loyalty. Good job, Mr. Chapman.

  • http://www.facebook.com/angela.hausman Angela Hausman

    Great advice C.C.  I agree stories are important elements for personalizing your social media because they resonate with visitors and build trust. Stories can be about you, your customers, or case studies about folks who are doing things right.  Here’s one of my favorite case studies showing successful integration of social media and offline marketing: http://hausmanmarketresearch.org/social-media-marketing-done-right

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Thanks Jordan!

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Thanks Angela.  This would be good for your students to understand as well…

  • http://resonancecontent.com/ Rachel Parker

    Great interview, Mike! I especially love C.C.’s comments about the US Army and how they deal with security issues — an ideal story for anyone who’s shying away from social media because they’re afraid of compromising their privacy. Great insight!

  • http://daviddoolin.com/ Dave Doolin

    I have been deleting a lot of dead links to blogs no longer in existence. 

    I can say – straight out – one way to stand out is to never, ever quit. My content is far from the best, but I’m still in the game for coming up on 3 years. So many people have dropped away, some of them with *really* good material, excellent writing voices, and superb social media skills. Where are those people now? Who can say? 

  • http://www.kronikmedia.co.uk/ K.Singh, London

     The entire Internet marketing industry is not content driven. I manage Internet marketing for many clients in London and I find that increasingly most of my time is spent on creating and publishing content. This is set to increase even further in the coming year.

  • Cynthia Wylie

    Hi Michael.  I appreciate your blog very much and find it extremely helpful.  And thank you C.C. for your informative “content.”  What is your opinion on content and stories that are not directly about one’s company website but are a related subject matter?  As an example, my company’s website teaches gardening to young children and I am doing video blogs about my experience growing up on a farm.  There are some on my team that think they shouldn’t be on the site.  Thanks for any input you can offer.  

    Cynthia Wylie
    http://www.BloomersIsland.com

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Agreed :)

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Dave – Indeed!  Stick with it!  But make sure it is working for you.

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Thanks for your kind words Cynthia.  I think it is better to do subject matter stories than company related for sure.

  • http://www.howtoimportwine.com Deborah Gray

    Great vlog. I don’t take advantage of all avenues of social media enough (time, being one issue!) but am always cognizant of what I’m saying when I do – being helpful, collaborative and bringing value-added to any conversation is my goal.

    I wanted to add something to your response to Cynthia, if I may. When marketing to children, what better way to get them interested in and excited about gardening than to relate it to personal experiences of childhood! I couldn’t disagree more with those who feel they have no place on the site, as long as your stories are fun and relatable – quirky animals, gardening tips from personal experience, farm chores you enjoyed because of what you learned, or how good the pie was, made from the fruit you grew, that sort of thing. Where a problem might develop is if they drift too far from the main issue, i.e. all about learning to steeplechase with your horse, or bringing pigs to market, when this is about gardening.

  • http://www.judyringer.com/ JudyRinger

    Great stuff, Michael, as always. How we tell our stories is what it’s all about. We live in stories of our own making. How we position those stories online can help people understand us, themselves, and the world we live in. -Judy

  • http://JackieUlmer.com/ Jackie Ulmer

    This is GREAT! It’s fun to see the different ways people use content and it better DEFINES content marketing. Stories DO sell!

    EXPECT Success!

    Jackie Ulmer

  • http://www.frankmedia.com.au Steph Chng

    Awesome. Content really gives a brand/company character and encourages sharing and dialogue – the essential ingredients for getting the most out of online & social!

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  • Peter

    I’m curious to know if you have found a distinction between the specific types of content? Is video more effective than the written word? Or vice versa? 

    I’m guessing video does not help in the SEO arena, but can be more engaging. 

  • http://www.i95dev.com/ecommerce-magento Henry Louis

    Hi Michael. I have watched the video. It is very informative regarding content marketing. Thanks for sharing your ideas.

  • ausstine22

    A very
    informative blog, with many, useful and helpful ideas. I recently read a
    post comparing direct marketing to content marketing and thought you might want
    to check it out. http://www.inboundsales.net/blog/bid/48652/Direct-Marketing-vs-Content-Marketing-What-Works-Best-For-Lead-Generation

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