How Bloggers Can Use Book Reviews to Connect With Experts

social media how toAre you looking to get the attention of experts in your industry?

Who writes the books your readers like to read? Experts do. And when these professionals share their knowledge in a new book, there’s one thing they highly covet—book reviews.

In this article I’ll share the power of a book review and how you might be able to review a brand-new book.

Why book reviews are powerful

As a blogger, you’re likely seeking hot tips and new ideas to share with your readers. A good review of a new book accomplishes two objectives.

First, book reviews highlight new ideas your readers can act upon. It also helps your base to know whether they should invest their valuable time in the book. A good book review is good content.


Here’s an example review we did of Scott Stratten’s book UnMarketing.

But a second (often overlooked) advantage is the attention a comprehensive review gains from the author. Bloggers are the press to authors. And trust me, authors watch for and read reviews of their books.

At Social Media Examiner we’ve been able to get the attention of high-profile individuals by simply reviewing their books. And in some situations those efforts have borne fruit that helped our business grow.

For example, authors often share the review with their fans and sometimes these experts have agreed to participate in our events. Pretty powerful, eh?

What makes for a good review?

The best book reviews actually share some of the ideas from the book. They go further by adding the thoughts and opinions of the blogger. A good place to start a review is to share a story from the book. For example, here’s how I did one for David Meerman Scott’s latest book.

Adding a video component when you review the book is also a great way to get the attention of authors. Those reviews can also be uploaded on Amazon for further exposure for you (be aware of Amazon’s 100MB file size limitation).


Here’s me doing a review of David’s book.

Also consider adding the cover image of the book and the author to your review.

A word of caution—be authentic in your review. Authors and your readers can tell when you’re just sucking up to the author.

Want a chance to review a new book?

On June 6, I’ll be releasing my new book: Launch: How to Quickly Propel Your Business Beyond the Competition (Wiley). It will share the precise strategy and tactics we used to grow Social Media Examiner into a top blog.

I want to prove that a book can be popular without the traditional media or methods most authors use to promote their books.

I’m inviting up to 50 bloggers to review my new book on their blog and receive an extra copy they can give away to their readers.

Here’s how you could win two free copies of my book:

I’ll review the entries and select the bloggers who’ll receive copies of the book.

WAIT, there’s more! (I always wanted to use that line). Social Media Examiner is looking for a new person to write book reviews for our site (in a volunteer role). We’ll be looking for someone among the 50 or so people we select above. It could be great exposure for your business.

Have you written book reviews as content for your blog? What advice can you share? Include your ideas in the comment section below.

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About the Author, Michael Stelzner

Michael Stelzner is the founder and CEO of Social Media Examiner, and host of the Social Media Marketing podcast. He also authored of the books Launch and Writing White Papers. Other posts by »




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  • http://lettersfromdan.com/ danrmorris

    I agree with your thoughts that a book review needs to feature the thoughts of the blogger – without attempting to suck up.

    What I like even more is when the author can not only relate to the book but provide ancillary examples from their own experiences that validate the points in the book.

  • http://www.robertantwi.com/blog/about-robert-antwi/ Robert Antwi

    Yes this is true, your draw in people that relate to what you like, have an interest in what you like and as its getting marketed – you will rank at least on first page for the title of the book.

  • LeoWid

    Hi Michael, what a thought provoking post.

    I was just about to write my own first book review today of a copy I received and this is just the advice I needed.

    May I also note, it is very smart how you combined advice on “how to” AND a very useful book review into one post. Definitely made me stick around.

    So, what can I say, great post and let me Buffer this awesome piece! :)

  • http://blog.ashleypichea.com Ashley Pichea

    I review books frequently on my blog. A few months ago, I reviewed UnMarketing, and when I promoted the review on Twitter, I made sure to include Scott’s Twitter handle in the tweet. As a result, he visited my blog (and left a comment) and then RTed my post to all of his followers.

  • http://twitter.com/marcseyon Marc Seyon

    How do you handle reviews of 1-star (or no-star) books?

  • http://www.puredriven.com Patrick Garmoe

    Darn, my secret it out! This is my #1 way to attract new readers to my blog. The bulk of my traffic has come from big bloggers linking to book reviews I have done. One thing I’ve learned that works really well, is not just saying why you did or didn’t like a book. Often I’ll do more of a summary of the book, pulling out one key point from each chapter. That provides a richer experience, because many people will read the review, knowing they aren’t going to take the time to read the full book.

    One caution though: this tactic only works if you really enjoy reading. Some people simply don’t like reading books, and therefore this would obviously be a major chore. I personally love reading. And this method provides value for me, the author, my audience and his or her audience. So it’s a win all the way around. I also try to republish a chunk on Amazon and B&N to be even more valuable to the author.

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Dan – Totally agree. Value add is the way to go

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Robert – That is a very good point. Be sure to include the full title of the book in your post title for SEO

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Thanks Leo!

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Ashley – Perfect case example!

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Marc – If you read a book that sucks, then perhaps you should let your readers know NOT to purchase it and explain why it’s a waste of their time

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Hey Patrick! Awesome! I hope you’ll consider registering to review a copy of my book above.

  • http://twitter.com/kimgusta Kim Gusta

    Great post, Michael. I have a new blog, AND I love to read business book so I’ll use this strategy to share useful content with my readers and attract followers.

    I’ll be interested in reading your new book, too – Social Media Examiner is a great case study on how to engage readers.

  • http://www.gadarian.com David Gadarian

    Too funny! Over the weekend I too did a video book review of David’s new book – http://goo.gl/i680P , and yes, the author, none other than David Meerman Scott was kind enough to pay my post a visit.

    I’m still relatively new to book reviews, but I’ve also had some great traction reviewing products. Thanks for the nice post.

  • http://www.puredriven.com Patrick Garmoe

    I already applied Michael! Looking forward to reading your book (I’ll buy it myself if I don’t get picked!) Hope to grab the regular reviewer position as well!

  • http://www.facebook.com/ClarkCovington Clark Covington

    Give people some type of incentive, early access, and guidelines to how you expect the review to be completed as an author. We offer a newsletter to over 9,000 people that have opted-in to receive book reviews at http://www.ReaderSpoils.com and see about 300 to 400 unique people requesting to review books per title we publish. The lesson here, I think at least, is that people are very responsive if you allow them to have early access and some type of form of appreciation. Even if it’s more symbolic than of large monetary value, the reviewer will feel more vested in giving the book an honest read and review.

  • http://www.cathrynhasek.com Cathryn

    I blog about “how-to” books on leadership, success, faith on my site. I am just finishing a book by Andy Andrews and may start another of his. He actually wrote me a direct message on Twitter that he enjoyed my site! It was a great ego boost and I hope that maybe I can get him to guest post…that would be the ultimate in good publicity.

  • Jackie Lampugnano

    As more of a reader of book reviews than a writer, I can say that one of the most important things to me is when the blogger not only does a summary (like Patrick mentioned above), but also tells me who the book is intended for. Sometimes an opinion of a book is based on the audience–if you’re not the audience, you might not find value in the book. So, if someone is writing a review of a book and tells me straight out that it’s probably a good fit for X person I’m able to assess whether it’s a) something targeted toward me/worth reading, and b) how much stock I put into that review.

  • http://jeffogden.net/ Jeff Ogden

    I’ve done a lot of book reviews. My lastest was for Rainmaking Conversations. I not only wrote a nice review, but I recorded a video review too. Check it out here.

    http://fearlesscompetitor.net/2011/04/19/my-review-of-rainmaking-conversations/

    Jeff Ogden

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Great advice Clark

  • http://everydayemstips.com Greg Friese

    My tips for writing book or product reviews http://www.everydayemstips.com/how-i-organize-a-book-or-product-review-post/

    I also use the LinkedIn reading list app to track books I am reading and to write notes for books as I read them.

  • http://www.abookfortheworkaholic.wordpress.com Mor

    I would very much like my book reviewed: http://www.abookfortheworkaholic.wordpress.com

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    That’s a very good point – especially when the title is vague.

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Hey Jeff – Glad you used video and a detailed post. And it’s interesting how the author immediately commented on your post

  • http://jeffogden.net/ Jeff Ogden

    Thanks Mike. Book reviews are something I’ve been doing for some time now. The side benefit – I buy very few books anymore – as authors provide them for free.

  • Larry Lourcey

    Great post. I need to start adding book reviews to my mix. It really does provide a good service to the readers… which is what it should ultimately be about anyways.

  • rhonda hurwitz

    Great post!

    I recently reviewed a social media book on my blog and Amazon, and yes, the author did comment and personally connect on Twitter, :) But becoming an evangelist for the ideas in the book is perhaps the biggest payoff for author and reviewer, alike. I got ideas from that book that influenced my blog, my tweets and my work for weeks after, which then spread virally … that is the real value, IMO.

    http://shemeansbusiness.wordpress.com/2011/03/31/book-review-the-executives-guide-to-enterprise-social-media-strategy/

  • Tknuppel

    I would love to begin doing book reviews. I retired from 34 years of teaching English and Writing at the High School level. I would welcome to chance to get involved in reviwing books.

  • cherylpickett

    I haven’t done book reviews on my blog yet (just started my current one earlier this year), but I plan to for many of the reasons you stated.

    I actually have advice for those seeking reviews and that’s to do what you did-ask! I recently read a great book that made an impact on my business and totally forgot about reviewing it on Amazon (or anywhere else). I had contacted the author though on Twitter and FB, so he knew I loved it. I’d submitted my receipt to get a bonus and a follow up email I believe it was, made a simple request to to an Amazon review if I liked the book.
    I, of course, said yes and did it right away because it was fresh in my mind and I was more than happy to spread the word. I haven’t made reviewing a regular habit yet, so had he not asked, it might have been weeks or months until I remembered to do it.

  • Marti_hohmann

    True enough. However, I’ve had publishers and authors take the one part of a review that is remotely positive, and excerpt that. Then your name is linked to stinker content for infinity. Patrick G (below) has adopted a common solution: summarize content without providing commentary. Although less satisfying intellectually, it’s less labor intensive, too.

  • http://daviddoolin.com/ Dave Doolin

    I’ve avoided book reviews because I know how much work they take to do properly. Also, coming from academia, one gets swamped with requests to do these things, and there’s just no payoff given how long it takes to do one, versus time better spent in research, teaching, grantsmanship, etc.

    However (I seem to write that a lot these days)…

    I now see the value in the context of relationship and content marketing.

    There’s a lesson, there, for others coming into this marketing thing from elsewhere: the value of the book review may be intangible, but important none-the-less.

    I’m going to pass on this offer as I’m committed to excellence doing something else over the next couple of months. But I have to say, Michael, you put book reviews into my toolbox. Now I need to learn to use the tool.

  • Nina Amir

    I’ve recently started reviewing both products and books both for the exposure to experts it offers and for the fact that I can make money in the process. If you like the book or product you can become an affiliate for that product or an Amazon affiliate and then provide the appropriate links. Then, if your readers click on the links and purchase the products and books, you make a bit of money! Since I’m actively trying to find a way to monetize my blogs without filling them with ads, this seems a good choice.

    Also, with a recent book review I wrote, I asked the author to answer a few questions for me. This added some nice content to the post. He ended up answering the questions and posting them on his blog first and mentioning me, which provided a nice link to my blog, and now I’ve republished the answers in my post. The exposure was great as well.

  • http://www.bluebanana.co.nz Linda Coles @ Blue Banana 20

    Good luck with book, can’t wait to hear the reviews, I’m sure it will be a stormer!

  • https://plus.google.com/u/0/100711269488721435135/ Baptiste Laurenge

    Great article, this come in handy as i’m planning to launch a book review blog in French, to share with my country-mates the awesomeness coming from the US :)

    Good luck with your book ! (i’m not applying for the contest cause i already have tons of books to review in preparation for my blog)

  • http://dinodogan.com/ Dino Dogan

    Congrats on the bok deal Mike. I cant wait to get my hands on it :-)

  • http://www.digitalvideovault.com.au Mio

    Good stuff Michael.
    I’m a big fan of Social Media Examiner, among others, for the reason you are using video in your marketing.
    Being a video producer myself, I’d like to point out to couple mistakes made in shooting this video (one applies to Jeff to).
    They are quite symptomatic for a non professional to make;

    1. Bad Composition – Placing a Talking Head in the middle of the frame.
    The shot is more dynamic, more eye pleasing if the head is not in the centre of the frame.
    Especially in Jeff’s video, head is sort of hanging, you should allow more space bellow your neck to appear and less space above your head. If you noticed in TV and movies, even “cutting off” top part of the head is not bad at all.
    But “cutting” off chin would be really awkward.
    For more about this, just search “rule of thirds”.

    2. Underexposed Image. In Michael’s video, camera exposed to bright window and thus making the face underexposed or too dark. I believe the camera Michael shot this with doesn’t have manual controls for exposure, but there is a way to reduce or completely remove this obstacle.

    Obvious solution is not to shoot with a window in a background, but if you really want to use that angle,
    all you need to do is to zoom in more on the face, and by that reducing the area of window in your frame and by that reducing amount of light entering the lens.

    Second solution (if you don’t want to zoom in that much) can be maybe placing a plant in the window
    and that way reducing amount of light hitting the lens, so camera doesn’t have to compensate any more for that light and your face will brighten up :)

    If you’d like to see some video samples, check it out here:
    http://www.digitalvideovault.com.au

  • http://www.experiate.net Paul Flanigan

    I have five suggestions: 1. Review books you WANT to read. Frankly, it doesn’t make sense to read a book that you didn’t really want to read to begin with, because you have already set yourself in a negative frame of mind. The author will have to work harder to engage you and change your mind than if you were positive going into it.

    2. Set a realistic review date. If you can only read 10 pages a day, then you need to commit to reviewing a month out if the book is 300 pages long. If you promise a review a week later and don’t deliver, people notice.

    3. Write in the book. Write all over it. Make notes, use sticky notes, use highlighters, make notes in the margins and front of book. Most of us don’t have perfect memories, so don’t kill yourself trying to go back and find that passage that really moved you. Make a note of it.

    4. Use video. YES YES YES. Imagine if a friend of yours wanted to tell you about a new movie he or she saw and she wrote you a letter. Use video. Regardless of the quality, video still has more impact. But keep it short. Two minutes max.

    5. Make sure the review matters to the purpose. To me, a review should succeed in helping you understand why you should read it, not necessarily to explain the book in full.

    My thoughts. . .

  • therealworld

    Hi Mike, firstly I want to say thank you for a great ongoing series of articles here on how to use social media. I’ve been in denial on the subject for some time, but started to look for sources to bring me up to speed, found your site and the information is great … thanks a bunch!

    As a video compression expert, I was about to make some suggestions to improve your video, but happened to see that Mio already has it pretty well covered. The main thing is never to shoot with a window as a background. For the exposure problem reasons that Mio mentions but for two other reasons.

    1) Distraction. The trees and parked cars make up about 80% of the frame in your video. That’s a lot of other stuff to focus on, instead of you. Luckily no one walked past, or drove away but that would be a major distraction … and one that you have no control over.

    2) Compression efficiency and quality. Mio suggested zooming in some to create a closer shot of you, this is good advice because once video is compressed it is also reduced in size, making YOU harder to see in your video on the page. For instance your video is 480 pixels high x 270 pixels wide, but your head only appears in about a 120 pixel square size … ie 10% of the shot. You’ll laugh to know that the WORST thing for codecs to compress is tree branches waving in the wind ;-) So make your background something solid like your bookshelves or a wall (not a plain empty one)

    If you wanted to take the edit a little further you could also cut to a still graphic of the book cover, rather than/as well as holding up the book. You can download the cover graphics from the web. For instance I found a cover image of David’s book 800 x 1219 pixels, more than enough to use in iMovie, Premier … or your favourite editing tool.

    cheers

    Dean

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Mio, great feedback!

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Thanks Dean

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Paul, wonderful advice

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Thanks Dino

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Wendy-Burnett/100000053396906 Wendy Burnett

    Dang it. I’d love to review your book, but it really wouldn’t fit very well with my readers or my niche. Somehow I’m guessing that the people who are looking for information about living well with chronic illness aren’t going to be all that interested in a business book. . .

  • http://websavvymarketers.com Carolyn Griswold

    As many bloggers do, I sometimes struggle with coming up with good ideas to write about. The book review is a great way to deliver information and educate myself in the process. Thanks for the great post.

  • http://www.parmfarm.com amy parmenter

    Michael:

    I just love the way you are promoting your book here on several different levels — and sharing terrific info at the same time. That’s why SME rocks.

    Amy Parmenter
    The ParmFarm

  • http://www.parmfarm.com amy parmenter

    Michael:

    I just love the way you are promoting your book here on several different levels — and sharing terrific info at the same time. That’s why SME rocks.

    Amy Parmenter
    The ParmFarm

  • http://www.edit911.com Marc Baldwin

    Michael,

    By way of introduction, I’ve been teaching writing and lit in high school and college since 75. I always tell my students a few things about book reviews.

    1) Keep it balanced if at all possible: highlight positive takeaways from the book, while offering constructive opposing views or criticism if you have any;

    2) Sprinkle into your review (using quotation marks) a few of the best lines/quotes from the book, to give the reader a better sense of the book’s true flavor and style; and

    3) Be kind and generous. Every book has a human being’s heart and soul invested in it.

    Love your work, sir. You’ve taught me any things!

    Marc D. Baldwin (PhD)
    Pres. Edit911.com

  • http://www.edit911.com Marc Baldwin

    Michael,

    By way of introduction, I’ve been teaching writing and lit in high school and college since 75. I always tell my students a few things about book reviews.

    1) Keep it balanced if at all possible: highlight positive takeaways from the book, while offering constructive opposing views or criticism if you have any;

    2) Sprinkle into your review (using quotation marks) a few of the best lines/quotes from the book, to give the reader a better sense of the book’s true flavor and style; and

    3) Be kind and generous. Every book has a human being’s heart and soul invested in it.

    Love your work, sir. You’ve taught me any things!

    Marc D. Baldwin (PhD)
    Pres. Edit911.com

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Thanks Amy!

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Thanks Amy!

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Great advice Marc!

  • http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/ Michael A. Stelzner

    Great advice Marc!

  • http://bloggingbistro.com/ Laura Christianson

    Michael – I’m chiming in from the perspective of an author (and of a consultant who helps other authors & publishing houses promote their books online). Publishers are cutting back on the advances they’re offering authors and their marketing budgets are increasingly being allocated to sure winners — those authors who have already proven their mettle.

    Even best-selling authors are now expected to do the lion’s share of their own book marketing. Thus, the value of online book reviews rises exponentially. I’ve discovered that bloggers who routinely review books take their job very seriously. They devote a tremendous amount of time and effort reading the book and writing a thoughtful, relatively unbiased review (you have to be willing to take the bad with the good when you submit your book to bloggers for review, because they tell it like it is!).

    But because these reviewers are passionate about reviewing books, they tend to stay in an author’s “stable” indefinitely, and they make themselves available to review additional books by the same author. In other words, they become a “fan” of the author. And while book review bloggers often have a small following, every little bit helps when it comes to book publicity. You never know who might be reading that review, and what that person’s sphere of influence is.

    When a blogger posts a 5-star review of one of my client’s books, I ask the blogger’s permission to reprint the review (or at least an excerpt from it) on the author’s blog. They almost always say yes. This results in an ever-increasing body of search engine optimized reviews online. Whenever someone googles the book’s title, they can’t help but discover a long list of terrific reviews.

  • http://bloggingbistro.com/ Laura Christianson

    Michael – I’m chiming in from the perspective of an author (and of a consultant who helps other authors & publishing houses promote their books online). Publishers are cutting back on the advances they’re offering authors and their marketing budgets are increasingly being allocated to sure winners — those authors who have already proven their mettle.

    Even best-selling authors are now expected to do the lion’s share of their own book marketing. Thus, the value of online book reviews rises exponentially. I’ve discovered that bloggers who routinely review books take their job very seriously. They devote a tremendous amount of time and effort reading the book and writing a thoughtful, relatively unbiased review (you have to be willing to take the bad with the good when you submit your book to bloggers for review, because they tell it like it is!).

    But because these reviewers are passionate about reviewing books, they tend to stay in an author’s “stable” indefinitely, and they make themselves available to review additional books by the same author. In other words, they become a “fan” of the author. And while book review bloggers often have a small following, every little bit helps when it comes to book publicity. You never know who might be reading that review, and what that person’s sphere of influence is.

    When a blogger posts a 5-star review of one of my client’s books, I ask the blogger’s permission to reprint the review (or at least an excerpt from it) on the author’s blog. They almost always say yes. This results in an ever-increasing body of search engine optimized reviews online. Whenever someone googles the book’s title, they can’t help but discover a long list of terrific reviews.

  • deb1221

    Hey Mike,
    Thanks for this post and congratulations on your upcoming book.

    I’m a big fan of reviewing industry books and wrote a post a while back, “Nine Steps for Getting Started Writing Blog Book Reviews,” which you can see @ http://bit.ly/jPojPY

    summarized below:

    1.check the list of new and upcoming books on a publisher’s website
    2. write to publisher’s rep and request a review copy
    3. take notes while you read the book, jot down a number of questions
    4. if you’re thinking about an interview, contact the author on LinkedIn or on their blog to request a Q & A
    5. write the post and/or conduct an audio interview on podcast (or video if you can do)
    6. be sure to disclose that you received the blog as a review copy
    7. notify the publisher and author when the post is available online
    8. get word out about the post via twitter, Facebook, blog, etc.
    9. write an online review on amazon

    Best of luck with your book!
    Debbie

  • deb1221

    Hey Mike,
    Thanks for this post and congratulations on your upcoming book.

    I’m a big fan of reviewing industry books and wrote a post a while back, “Nine Steps for Getting Started Writing Blog Book Reviews,” which you can see @ http://bit.ly/jPojPY

    summarized below:

    1.check the list of new and upcoming books on a publisher’s website
    2. write to publisher’s rep and request a review copy
    3. take notes while you read the book, jot down a number of questions
    4. if you’re thinking about an interview, contact the author on LinkedIn or on their blog to request a Q & A
    5. write the post and/or conduct an audio interview on podcast (or video if you can do)
    6. be sure to disclose that you received the blog as a review copy
    7. notify the publisher and author when the post is available online
    8. get word out about the post via twitter, Facebook, blog, etc.
    9. write an online review on amazon

    Best of luck with your book!
    Debbie

  • Shema2

    I would be glad to review your book but I dont want to have to buy it to do it It sounds like a gimic to increase book sales. You should be able to give access by a password protected site to enable a blogger access for review.

  • Shema2

    I would be glad to review your book but I dont want to have to buy it to do it It sounds like a gimic to increase book sales. You should be able to give access by a password protected site to enable a blogger access for review.

  • http://www.victoriamavis.com Victoria

    I’m in the process of reorganizing my blogs and just started featuring a book review section. I was amazed when the author of one of the books, jumped on my blog (shortly after it was posted) and commented on the post and the blog. I was honored that he took the time to check it out and acknowledge it.

    Can’t wait to read the new book!

    ~Victoria

  • http://www.victoriamavis.com Victoria

    I’m in the process of reorganizing my blogs and just started featuring a book review section. I was amazed when the author of one of the books, jumped on my blog (shortly after it was posted) and commented on the post and the blog. I was honored that he took the time to check it out and acknowledge it.

    Can’t wait to read the new book!

    ~Victoria

  • http://www.online-business-virtual-assistant.com/ Shilpi Roy – Virtual Assistant

    Great post and social media examiner is a place where startups like us get useful and motivating info to improve our business.

  • http://www.online-business-virtual-assistant.com/ Shilpi Roy – Virtual Assistant

    Great post and social media examiner is a place where startups like us get useful and motivating info to improve our business.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_H7NCOCCESSIMD3LWMLZX3GUVUA Ali

    That’s very nice! I like the advices on how to make book review. For owning a small website about writings, I might even use your ideas. I have to admit that I underestimated the power of book reviews, but now that I think about it, what you said is very logic. I also like the idea of reviwing the book in a video and put it on Amazon… that’s like the best way you can probably do, knowing how Amazon is so popular! Thank you!
    http://www.thewritingcorner.net

  • Pingback: WriterAccess Weekly Round-up: Best and Worst of Blogging | WriterAccess Blog

  • http://essenceofperformance.blogspot.com/ Christopher Hudson

     Wow … a blog about how to be a better blogger … for a guy whose blog sits abandoned and alone in Internet back alleys, this is absolutely amazing.

  • http://newdaynewlesson.com/ Susie @ Newdaynewlesson

    I love reading books. Too bad I am too late for your offer.

    Funny I should have come upon this on twitter because I have been thinking about doing book reviews of books I love. Need to find the time to start doing it.

  • http://www.growingvillage.org/Growing_Village/Reviews.html Meredith Scherrer

    Michael-
    I’ve been writing book reviews for a while at http://www.growingvillage.org/Growing_Village/Reviews.html and I was wondering how I can get publishers to send a copy of their newest books to me so I can review them.  (Right now I’m getting my book inspirations from hanging out at the public library, but that doesn’t always get me the newest material).  Thanks!
    -Meredith

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